☕ Book Break ☕ | Sugar by Deirdre Riordan Hall

 

Sugar

by Deirdre Riordan Hall

“I lean against the doorframe, heavy with the truth. I am always in the way. I’ve known this for as long as I can remember.”

“I’ve always been too much and yet not enough.”

“I know how to swim, but I feel like I’m drowning.”

I loved this young adult novel. I admit I had a hard time getting into this book at the beginning, but it wasn’t long before I was drawn into the plot. Sugar’s story resonated with me, and I am glad a friend recommended this novel. 

Sugar is a 17-year-old girl with an eating disorder. Home life is fraught with abuse both mental and physical. Sugar is a good girl. She tries with all her might to please her family, but they are never satisfied. She eats to fill the painful void left by rejection.

Other readers have mentioned that the middle of the novel dragged, but I didn’t notice this. I felt the story moved along at a sufficient pace and it kept my interest throughout. It actually kept me awake when I should have gone to bed!

Sugar was a quick read.  Deirdre Riordan Hall’s storytelling style is somewhat straightforward, but the story line and characters were engaging. I found myself rooting for Sugar.

The novel has a satisfactory ending, although tragedy (more tragedy!) does visit Sugar’s world. All the ends tie up nicely without it being too gooey-happy in the end. This is an empowering read for girls going through difficult times. Upon finishing the book, my overall feeling was one of hope. This is a story about rejection, how teens value themselves, and about overcoming.

Sugar’s battles tugged at my heart. This is one I categorize as must read for teens and adults simply because the character spoke volumes to me. It is a deceptively simple tale that delves deep. I found it an emotional read that stuck with me after I turned the last page.

With a caution for younger readers about topics covered, I would highly recommend this book for pre-teens, teens, and adults.

Topics:

Obesity, abuse, abandonment, bullying, assault, attempted rape, contains language, death, mentions of Catholic religion, prayers, rituals.

Deirdre Riordan Hall talks ‘Sugar’ and speaking up against bullies.

Author’s Website

 

 

 

 

Gravity Is the Thing by Jaclyn Moriarty #popsugarreadingchallenge2019

#popsugarreadingchallenge2019

A book published in 2019

Gravity Is the Thing by Jaclyn Moriarty

Abi’s brother, Robert, went missing twenty years ago, on the eve of Abi’s sixteenth birthday. At the same time, Abi began to receive single chapters to a self-help book, The Guidebook, in the mail. The chapters come in no particular order. 

Through the years, the scattered chapters of The Guidebook have remained a constant as Abi grieves her brother, marries, divorces, becomes a single mother, and opens a cafe. Then one day she receives an invitation from the authors of The Guidebook to attend a retreat.

The main character was completely lovable, scattered, and heartbreakingly vulnerable while at the same time being quirky and funny. 

The storyline hops back-and-forth in time I’m about as we get to know her we understand more and more of her emotional pain. I usually prefer books that tell a story in a straight line, however this one unfolded beautifully with a series of alternating scenarios that were amusing and heart rending. Everything ended with a proper resolution without feeling contrived. Abi is on a search to mend her life and find happiness. I loved this character and wished I could visit her cafe. 

The minor characters were all just as memorable as the MC.

The story is set in Australia.

I plan to look for more by this author.

Characters

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Plot

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Thought Provoking

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Touching

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Satisfying

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

☕ Book Break ☕ | Just Listen  by Sarah Dessen

Just Listen  by Sarah Dessen

Guys, I think I found my favorite book by Sarah Dessen.

Annabel appears to have the perfect life, at least in the commercials she appears in as her job as a model. Her sister is anorexic. Her former best friend, Sophie, has it in for her. Owen, boy who is obsessed with music and a loner, befriends Annabelle. He has a habit of telling the truth. Annabel has secrets she can’t bring herself to talk about, but he’s not going to let that lie.

I love issue driven fiction and Sara Dessen is good at bringing these topics to light with a well told story. The characters are complex and I felt myself immersed in their lives.

Things aren’t always what they appear to be, and this novel reminds us of that. 

All the stars.

#READWHATYOUOWN September Jupiter Winds by C. J. Darlington

Jupiter Winds by C. J. Darlington

#readwhatyouown

hosted by

@anovelfamily

I picked this book based on the cover and the title, and also my curiosity as to how it got on my Kindle. I don’t read a huge amount of sci fi.

if you like action packed, soft sci fi with a strong female protagonist, you might like this book. It has a Christian theme, but it’s not pushy, and feels natural in my opinion. When I was a kid I was addicted to Star Trek reruns, as was my dad, and as are my boys. I would have loved to have had this type of book when I was a teenager. 

I like the fact that alongside the male pilots and commanders, there are plenty of strong female characters in the story. Age doesn’t seem to matter, either! All in all a well balanced, fast paced, enjoyable read for fans of soft scifi.

Violence and death. Fight scenes.

Action

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Strong Female Protagonist 

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Christian/Inspy YA Sci Fi

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

☕ Book Break ☕ | To Best the Boys by Mary Weber

To Best the Boys by Mary Weber

This light fantasy YA novel was a quick read for me. It caught my interest from the first line and kept it throughout the entire story. If I were to pick one book for a teen girl or a preteen girl who is a reluctant reader, this one might be it. The characters are, in my opinion, completely relatable to girls today. It felt a little less intense than Hunger Games or Maze Runner, but had similar elements. Positive messages about following your dreams and fighting for women’s rights to an education. Squeaky clean. 

It wasn’t what I was expecting from either the title or the cover. The main character enters a competition with boys, but there’s an equal focus on her home life and a dash of romance, which rounded the story out nicely for me. I was surprised at how much I liked this book. My feed was flooded with this book several months before it came out, but every time I checked to see if it was available it wasn’t out yet, so it got bumped to the bottom of my list. I’m glad I finally got to it. Recommended for all readers and reluctant readers. 

Positive Message

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

 

Positive Female Role Model

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

 

Entertaining 

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

☕ Book Break ☕ |The Boy In The Black Suit by Jason Reynolds #popsugarreadingchallenge

#popsugarreadingchallenge

A Book With Clothing on The Cover

The Boy in the Black Suit by Jason Reynolds

Sixteen year old Matt wears a black suit every day, not because his mother dies, but for his job at the funeral home. That and his habit of sitting in on services. He’s looking for a way to deal with his grief, and encounters a girl who might just know the answer. He sure won’t find help from his dad, who seems to be trying to drown his sorrow in a bottle.

My heart broke a little bit with every page. 

The voice and sense of place drew me into his world. I would not hesitate to recommend this for anyone from pre-teens to adults. 

A true page turner. Happy-sad. A bit of romance. Realistic, coming of age.  A perfect book for teens about coming to terms with grief of any sort.

Go get it. Recommended for all.

Characters

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

All the Feels

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Relatable

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Storyline

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Engaging

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Well Written

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

☕ Book Break ☕ | The Girl He Used to Know by Tracey Garvis Graves

 

The Girl He Used to Know

 

I adore restoration of lost love stories. 

 

Overall I loved, loved, loved the characters and the story. I cried buckets. Every now and then I got stressed out for Annika and the situations she got herself into. 

  

The way the author showed how adults on the spectrum can continue to grow and learn new skills was definitely something I appreciate being addressed. Too often people assume that someone with a developmental disability or cognitive delays only has until the end of high school to acquire skills. There were pains taken to correctly define ASD without sounding like it was out of place. The writing was seamless, the story moving along and unfolding naturally.

 

The writer obviously did her research to accurately portray Annika, although I would love to see more books about people on the spectrum with less stereotypical autsitc characters. Not all autistics rock, flick their fingers, or crave solitude. 

 

Well worth the read. 

 

This may be on the top of my best books this year because of my interest in autistic characters and simply because it is an engaging, well plotted novel with emotional impact. I will check out other books by this author.

 

Things I LOVED

 

Characters

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

 

Plot (some people felt it was a little cheesy at the end, but I liked it)

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

 

Need for Kleenex for Weepy Moments

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

 

Satisfying Ending

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

 

General All Around Lovely Novel

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

A little spicy. A few sex scenes, but not as steamy as The Kiss Quotient.